Medicare Audits – TPE Audits Are Here, But For How Long?

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the expansion of Targeted Probe and Educate (TPE) audits. At first glance, this appears to be fantastic news coming on the heels of so much craziness at Health and Human Services (HHS). We have former-HHS Secretary Price flying our tax dollars all over. Dr. Don Wright stepping up as our new Secretary. The Medicare appeal backlog fiasco. The repeal and replace Obamacare bomb. Amidst all this tomfoolery, health care providers are still serving Medicare and Medicaid patients, reimbursement rates are in the toilet, which drives down quality and incentivizes providers to not accept Medicare or Medicaid (especially Caid), and providers are undergoing “Audit Alphabet Soup.” I actually had a client tell me that he receives audit letters requesting documents and money every single week from a plethora of different organizations.

So when CMS announced that it was broadening its TPE audits, it was a sigh of relief for many providers. But will TPE audits be the benign beasts they are purporting  to be?

What is a TPE audit? (And – Can We Have Anymore Acronyms…PLEASE!)

CMS says that TPE audits are benevolent. CMS’ rhetoric indicates that these audits should not cause the toner to run out from overuse. CMS states that TPE audits will involve “the review of 20-40 claims per provider, per item or service, per round, for a total of up to three rounds of review.” See CMS Announcement. The idea behind the TPE audits (supposedly) is education, not recoupments. CMS states that “After each round, providers are offered individualized education based on the results of their reviews. This program began as a pilot in one MAC jurisdiction in June 2016 and was expanded to three additional MAC jurisdictions in July 2017. As a result of the successes demonstrated during the pilot, including an increase in the acceptance of provider education as well as a decrease in appealed claims decisions, CMS has decided to expand to all MAC jurisdictions later in 2017.” – And “later in 2017” has arrived. These TPE audits are currently being conducted nationwide.

Below is CMS’ vision for a TPE audit:

TPE3

Clear? As mud?

The chart does not indicate how long the provider will have to submit records or how quickly the TPE auditors will review the documents for compliance. But it appears to me that getting through Round 3 could take a year (this is a guess based on allowing the provider 30 days to gather the records and allowing the TPE auditor 30 days to review).

Although the audit is purportedly benign and less burdensome, a TPE audit could take a whole year or more. Whether the audit reviews one claim or 20, having to undergo an audit of any size for a year is burdensome on a provider. In fact, I have seen many companies having to hire staff dedicated to responding to audits. And here is the problem with that – there aren’t many people who understand Medicare/caid medical billing. Providers beware – if you rely on an independent biller or an electronic medical records program, they better be accurate. Otherwise the buck stops with your NPI number.

Going back to CMS’ chart (above), notice where all the “yeses” go. As in, if the provider is found compliant , during any round, all the yeses point to “Discontinue for at least 12 months.” I am sure that CMS thought it was doing providers a favor, but what that tells me is the TPE audit will return after 12 months! If the provider is found compliant, the audit is not concluded. In fact, according to the chart, the only end results are (1) a referral to CMS for possible further action; or (2) continued TPE audits after 12 months. “Further action” could include 100% prepayment review, extrapolation, referral to a Recovery Auditor, or other action. Where is the outcome that the provider receives an A+ and is left alone??

CMS states that “Providers/suppliers may be removed from the review process after any of the three rounds of probe review, if they demonstrate low error rates or sufficient improvement in error rates, as determined by CMS.”

I just feel as though that word “may” should be “will.” It’s amazing how one word could change the entire process.

About kemanuel

Medicare and Medicaid Regulatory Compliance Litigator

Posted on October 3, 2017, in Affordable Care Act, Alleged Overpayment, Appealing Adverse Decisions, Audits, CMS, Federal Government, Federal Law, HHS, Knicole Emanuel, Legal Analysis, Medicaid, Medicaid Attorney, Medicaid Audits, Medicare, Medicare Appeal Process, Medicare Attorney, Medicare Audits, Medicare RAC, Obamacare, Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, Post-Payment Reviews, Prepayment Review, RAC Audits, Regulatory Audits and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Joseph Korzelius

    I was put through the ringer a couple months ago by a surprise audit after receiving an accepted Plan of Correction 9 months earlier. I was told there would be medicaid audits every : years so I thought I had time to update my files. I was caught without any file updated since I was extremely busy(no excuse I know) but the auditor made it out like it was nothing. I had to pay an attorney 25k to represent me and I still had to plead to one felony. Currently, I am awaiting sentencing, had to resign as a school counselor after 10 years, foreclosing on my home, working as a janitor. It appeared the attorney knew the auditor so I thought no problem and all the time they kept laughing and saying not to worry. Please understand that it does not matter how you explain or if had rights read to you. Don’t not and I repeat do not talk to anyone saying they are a medicaid auditor, but get a lawyer first or they can use against you. Thanks and good luck!

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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