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Medicare Reform Proposals Include Eliminating “Incident-to” Rules

There are a lot of concerns related to “incident-to billing. However, for physician practices, “incident-to” billing is a money maker, which, in the world, of sub-par Medicare reimbursement rates is a minute ray of sunshine in an otherwise eclipsed land. Auditors argue that there are fraud and abuse concerns because practices ignore or are confused about the rules and bill everything “incident-toregardless of the conditions being met. This can result in a nasty audit, as well as substantial fines, penalties, and attorneys’ fees. If you bill “incident-to,” just follow the rules…unless those rules are eliminated. Until possible elimination, keep up with the rules, which can differ depending on the auditor in the region.

Recently, people have been pushing for Medicare reform to include disallowing nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) from billing “incident-to.” Proponents of the suggested amendment claims that the recommendation would save the Medicare program money — approximately $50 to $250 million annually and just under $1 billion over 5 years.

The number of NPs who bill Medicare has more than doubled, from 52,000 to 130,000 from 2010 to 2017

What is “incident-to” billing?

In colloquialism, “incident-to” billing allows non-physician providers (NPPs) to report services “as if” they were performed by a physician. The NPP stands in the shoes of the physician. The advantage is that, under Medicare rules, covered services provided by NPPs typically are reimbursed at 85% of the fee schedule amount; whereas, services properly reported “incident-to” are reimbursed at the full fee schedule value.

In legalize, “incident-to” services under §1861(s)(2)(A) of the Social Security Act are provided by NPPs as a part of the services provided directly by the physician, but billed as if they were in fact performed by the physician. Several, legal, threshold requirements must be satisfied before billing eligibility for these services is established.

Billing using “incident-to” can be a huge money-maker for providers. If billed incorrectly, it can also be a provider’s financial downfall.

“Incident-to” billing can only apply to established patients. Not new patients. Not consults. The other non-negotiable factor is that the physician who is supervising must be on-site. Not a phone call away. Not grabbing a burger at a local eatery. On-site. Although with hospitals, the cafeteria is a viable option. I foresee, in the future, telehealth and Skype may change this on-site requirement. The incident-to rules also require that the services be part of a patient’s normal course of treatment.  The rules require that the physician remains actively involved in the patient’s course of treatment.  There must be direct supervision.  Direct supervision = on-site. The following services cannot be billed as “incident-to:”

  • new patient visits
  • visits in which an established patient is seen for a new problem
  • visits in which the treatment provided or prescribed is not a part of the treatment plan established by a physician
  • services provided in the hospital or ambulatory surgery center.

Do not confuse “incident-to” with Medicare patients versus Medicaid patients. MediCAID’s regulations for the coverage of MD services vary significantly than Medicare’s rules and requires direct contact with the patient with exceptions.

Here is a question that I often get: “When billing “incident-to,” do you bill “incident to” the physician who is physically on-site that day or the physician who is overseeing that patient’s care? Both physicians are in the same group and it is billed under the Group NPI, but not sure which physician to reference for “incident-to.”

Answer: Bill under the MD who is on-site. This was addressed by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in the 2016 Physician Fee Schedule Final Rule.

The Medicare Benefit Policy Manual addresses the “incident-to” rules for each provider type and in any scenario:

  • Section 60 contains policies for services furnished incident to physicians’ services in the physician’s office.
  • Chapter 6, section 20.5 enumerates the policies for therapeutic services furnished “incident-to” physicians’ services in the hospital outpatient setting.
  • Section 80 states the policies for diagnostic tests in the physician’s office
  • Chapter 6, section 20.4 lists the policies for diagnostic tests furnished in the hospital outpatient setting.

Drug Administration under “incident-to”

“The Medicare program provides limited benefits for outpatient prescription drugs. The program covers drugs that are furnished “incident to” a physician’s service provided that the drugs are not usually self-administered by the patients who take them.” Medicare Benefit Policy Manual, 50.2. Injectable drugs, including intravenously administered drugs, are typically eligible for inclusion under the “incident-to” benefit.

The Medicare Administrative Contracts (MACs) (or – auditors) must fully explain the process they will use to determine whether a drug is usually self-administered and thus does not meet the “incident-to” benefit category. The MACs must publish a list of the injectable drugs that are subject to the self-administered exclusion. If there is discrepancy amongst the MACs, a lawsuit could help.

In order to meet all the general requirements for coverage under the “incident-to” provision, an FDA approved drug or biological must:

  • Be of a form that is not usually self-administered;
  • Must be furnished by a physician; and
  • Must be administered by the physician, or by auxiliary personnel employed by the physician and under the physician’s personal supervision

The charge, if any, for the drug or biological must be included in the physician’s bill, and the cost of the drug or biological must represent an expense to the physician.

Summary

“Incident-to” billing is subject to elimination. The difference in billing “incident-to” is a 100% reimbursement rate versus an 85% reimbursement rate. That 15% difference cannot be passed onto the Medicare recipients.

While “incident-to” billing continues to be allowed, it is imperative to keep up with the ever changing rules.

 

 

 

Premature Recoupment of Medicare or Medicaid Funds Can Feel Like Getting Mauled by Dodgeballs: But Is It Constitutional?

State and federal governments contract with many private vendors to manage Medicare and Medicaid. And regulatory audits are fair game for all these contracted vendors and, even more – the government also contracts with private companies that are specifically hired to audit health care providers. Not even counting the contracted vendors that manage Medicaid or Medicare (the companies to which you bill and get paid), we have Recovery Act Contractors (RAC), Zone Program Integrity Contractors (ZPICs), Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs), and Comprehensive Error Rate Testing (CERT) auditors. See blog for explanation. ZPICs, RACs, and MACs conduct pre-payment audits. ZPICs, RACs, MACs, and CERTs conduct post-payment audits.

It can seem that audits can hit you from every side.

dodgeball.jpg

“Remember the 5 D’s of dodgeball: Dodge, duck, dip, dive and dodge.”

Remember the 5 A’s of audits: Appeal, argue, apply, attest, and appeal.”

Medicare providers can contest payment denials (whether pre-payment or post-payment) through a five-level appeal process. See blog.

On the other hand, Medicaid provider appeals vary depending on which state law applies. For example, in NC, the general process is an informal reconsideration review (which has .008% because, essentially you are appealing to the very entity that decided you owed an overpayment), then you file a Petition for Contested Case at the Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH). Your likelihood of success greatly increases at the OAH level because these hearings are conducted by an impartial judge. Unlike in New Mexico, where the administrative law judges are hired by Human Services Department, which is the agency that decided you owe an overpayment. In NM, your chance of success increases greatly on judicial review.

In Tx, providers may use three methods to appeal Medicaid fee-for-service and carve-out service claims to Texas Medicaid & Healthcare Partnership (TMHP): electronic, Automated Inquiry System (AIS), or paper within 120 days.

In Il, you have 60-days to identify the total amount of all undisputed and disputed audit
overpayment. You must report, explain and repay any overpayment, pursuant to 42 U.S.C.A. Section 1320a-7k(d) and Illinois Public Aid Code 305 ILCS 5/12-4.25(L). The OIG will forward the appeal request pertaining to all disputed audit overpayments to the Office of Counsel to the Inspector General for resolution. The provider will have the opportunity to appeal the Final Audit Determination, pursuant to the hearing process established by 89 Illinois Adm. Code, Sections 104 and 140.1 et. seq.

You get the point.”Nobody makes me bleed my own blood. Nobody!” – White Goodman

Recoupment During Appeals

Regardless whether you are appealing a Medicare or Medicaid alleged overpayment, the appeals process takes time. Years in some circumstances. While the time gently passes during the appeal process, can the government or one of its minions recoup funds while your appeal is pending?

The answer is: It depends.

soapbox

Before I explain, I hear my soapbox calling, so I will jump right on it. It is my legal opinion (and I am usually right) that recoupment prior to the appeal process is complete is a violation of due process. People are always shocked how many laws and regulations, both on the federal and state level, are unconstitutional. People think, well, that’s the law…it must be legal. Incorrect. Because something is allowed or not allowed by law does not mean the law is constitutional. If Congress passed a law that made it illegal to travel between states via car, that would be unconstitutional. In instances that the government is allowed to recoup Medicaid/care prior to the appeal is complete, in my (educated) opinion. However, until a provider will fund a lawsuit to strike these allowances, the rules are what they are. Soapbox – off.

Going back to whether recoupment may occur before your appeal is complete…

For Medicare audit appeals, there can be no recoupment at levels one and two. After level two, however, the dodgeballs can fly, according to the regulations. Remember, the time between levels two and three can be 3 – 5 years, maybe longer. See blog. There are legal options for a Medicare provider to stop recoupments during the 3rd through 5th levels of appeal and many are successful. But according to the black letter of the law, Medicare reimbursements can be recouped during the appeal process.

Medicaid recoupment prior to the appeal process varies depending on the state. Recoupment is not allowed in NC while the appeal process is ongoing. Even if you reside in a state that allows recoupment while the appeal process is ongoing – that does not mean that the recoupment is legal and constitutional. You do have legal rights! You do not need to be the last kid in the middle of a dodgeball game.

Don’t be this guy:

stock-vector-cartoon-boy-getting-pelted-by-dodge-balls-189985841