New Federal Legislation Proposed to Increase Due Process for Health Care Providers!

Every once in a blue moon, I am actually happy with the actions of our government. One of these rare occasions occurred on March 17, 2016. Happy St. Patty’s Day!

On March 17, 2016, Senior Senator John Thune from South Dakota introduced S.2736: A bill to require consideration of the impact on beneficiary access to care and to enhance due process protections in procedures for suspending payments to Medicaid providers.

How many times have I blogged about the nonexistence of due process for Medicaid providers??? I cannot even count. (Well,I probably could count, but it take quite some time). My readers know that I have been complaining for years that the federal regulations consider Medicaid provider guilty until proven innocent. See blog. And blog.

Well, finally, someone in Congress has taken notice.What is really cool is that my team at my law firm Gordon & Rees was asked to provide some input for this bill…pretty cool! Although I have to say, everything that we proposed is not included in the proposed bill. Apparently, some of our suggestions were too “pro provider” and “didn’t stand a chance to be passed.” Who would have thought? Baby steps, I was informed.

The bill, if enacted, would require the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to revise the Code of Federal Regulations, specifically the Title 42 of the CFR.

Currently, 42 CFR 455.23 reads: “the State Medicaid agency must suspend all Medicaid payments to a provider after the agency determines there is a credible allegation of fraud for which an investigation is pending under the Medicaid program against an individual or entity unless the agency has good cause to not suspend payments or to suspend payment only in part.” (emphasis added). Rarely has a state agency found “good cause” to not suspend payments. In fact, quite the opposite. I have seen state agencies use this regulation harshly and with intent to put providers out of business.

S.2736 would revise the above-mentioned language and require that a state agency take certain steps to ensure due process for the provider prior to implementing a suspension in payments.

Prior to implementing a payment suspension, this proposed bill would require the state agency to:

  • Consult with the Medicaid fraud unit for the state and receive written confirmation of such a consultation; and
  • Certify that the agency considered whether beneficiary access would be jeopardized or whether good cause exists, in whole or in part (according to the new, proposed manner of determining good cause)

We all know that the above bullet points supply more protection than we have now.

Furthermore, there are protections on the back end.

After a suspension is implemented, at the beginning of each fiscal quarter, the state Medicaid agency must:

  • certify to the Secretary that it has considered whether the suspension of payments should be terminated or modified due to good cause (as modified by S.2736); and
  • if no good cause is found, furnish to the provider the reasons for such determination.

S.2736 allow requires the agency to disclose the specific allegations of fraud that is being investigated (after a reasonable amount of time) and to evaluate every 180 days whether good cause exists to lift the suspension. Regardless, good cause not to continue the suspension will be deemed to exist after 18 months (with some other qualifying details).

According to a government track website, this bill has a 8% chance of getting past committee. And a 3% chance of being enacted.

The stats on all bills’ “pass-ability,” is that only 15% of bills made it past committee and only about 3% were enacted in 2013–2015.

So call your Congressman or woman! Support S.2736! It’s not perfect, but it’s better!!!

About kemanuel

Medicare and Medicaid Regulatory Compliance Litigator

Posted on March 22, 2016, in "Single State Agency", Access to Care, Administrative code, Administrative Remedies, Agency, CMS, Congress, Credible Allegations of Fraud, DHHS, Due process, Federal Law, Gordon & Rees, Health Care Providers and Services, HHS, Innocent Until Proven Guilty, Knicole Emanuel, Legal Analysis, Legal Remedies for Medicaid Providers, Legislation, Medicaid, Medicaid Advocate, Medicaid Attorney, Medicaid Audits, Medicaid Providers, Medicaid Reimbursements, Medicare Attorney, Medicare Audits, NC, North Carolina, Post-Payment Reviews, Program Integrity, RAC Audits, Regulatory Audits, Secretary of Health and Human Services and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Frances Chavez MD

    What remedies are would you suggest for an individual physicians who has deprived of due process in similar circumstances in New Mexico? Who can help?

  2. Frances Chavez MD

    Thrown under the bus.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: