NC Group Home Residents Lose Medicaid Funds: May Lose Homes

NC residents who live in Medicaid-funded group homes suffer mental illnesses or developmental disabilities.  Group homes allow the residents a home-like atmosphere and 24/7 health care and personal care services, such as help with toileting, bathing, and eating.

The federal government informed NC that the state was using the wrong eligibility criteria for Medicaid recipients receiving personal care. Personal care services (PCS) is a paraprofessional service that covers the services of an aide in the recipient’s private residence or group home to assist with the recipient’s personal care needs that are directly linked to a medical condition.

To fix the eligibility problem pointed out by the feds, the General Assembly set up a $39.7 million fund to pay for adult care homes, but group homes were unintentionally excluded. If the legislators did not use the word “only” in the legislation, most likely, group homes would have been covered. But in “only” covering adult care homes, group homes were excluded.

The result of the General Assembly’s oversight is that approximately 1400 people may be homeless starting January 1, 2013.

Despite an outcry from the General Assembly for Purdue to call a special session, Purdue refused. Instead, last week, Purdue announced that she was moving $1 million dollars within the Department of Health and Human Services to pay for group homes through January 2013. This allows the group home residents one extra month before Medicaid funding is gone.

The General Assembly organizes January 9th, but is not scheduled to conduct business until January 30, 2013….the day Medicaid funding will cease for the group homes.

 

About kemanuel

Medicare and Medicaid Regulatory Compliance Litigator

Posted on December 27, 2012, in DHHS, Group Homes, Medicaid, Medicaid Eligibility, Medicaid Funds, Medical Necessity, Mental Illness, North Carolina, Perdue, Personal Care Services and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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